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Digital Threshold Live is a series of webcasts featuring new guest speakers in each episode from a variety of industries moderated by Evolv Technology's Co-founder & Head of Corporate Development, Anil Chitkara. Learn More.

 
 

EPISODE 2:

Trust and Confidence: The Foundation of Delivering an Exceptional Visitor Experience.

Aired Live on October 22, 2020 at 1pm ET

Watch the OnDemand version below.

Jason White

Managing Director of Corporate Safety and Security

Hershey Entertainment and Resorts

For many, navigating the ups and downs of the past few months has been nothing short of a roller coaster ride. Who better to hear from about earning trust and building confidence as key components of a healthy reopening than Jason White, Managing Director of Corporate Safety and Security at Hershey Entertainment and Resorts. 

 

Key Takeaways from Episode 2:

  1. It's all about balance - uncompromising security and an outstanding guest experience can coexist.
  2. Safeguarding guests and employees with rigorous safety protocols are equally important.
  3. Being ready for future challenges means we should treat our business continuity and risk management planning as living processes, not to be written once and filed away. 
 

Countdown to Episode 2 Live

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Digital Threshold Live - Episode 2 Transcript

Anil Chitkara:

Welcome to the Digital Threshold Live. We will bring you practitioners and professionals at the intersection of venues and technology. They'll share their experiences of turning challenges into opportunities and inspire you to think about the venue of their future. Let's get started.

Anil Chitkara:

Jason, how are you?

Jason White:

Good afternoon. I'm very well, thank you for having me.

Anil Chitkara:

Great to have you. So I'm fascinated by the history of Hershey. Hershey the town, Hershey the park, and of course the school. Can you give us a little background, what is the history of Hershey?

Jason White:

Sure. And, we've got the unique distinction. Hershey is definitely a town built around one thing, and that is chocolate. Our founder, Milton Hershey had several different endeavors that he went through with some caramels and some other things before he finally came back to Central Pennsylvania and started his famous chocolate factory, which at one time was the largest chocolate factory in the world. And, as a town popped up around this chocolate factory, Hershey pretty much controlled everything. And, he began to build and supply amenities for his workers to keep them happy and satisfied, one of which was a park in close proximity to the chocolate factory that has grown and developed and turned into what we have today as Hersheypark, the 121-acre amusement park that is the centerpiece of Hershey Entertainment and Resorts. So our organization is Hersheypark, that amusement park. We also have several resorts and a lot of other hospitality and recreation type amenities throughout the town, that is what we call Hershey Entertainment and Resorts today.

Anil Chitkara:

What I find so fascinating is so early on he was focused on the people on his employees, on the family of his employees and the people in the general community there. And he started the Milton Hershey School, which is just a tremendous asset to that region. Can you just tell us a little bit about the school itself?

Jason White:

Certainly. And, that is really what sets us apart and what really instills so much pride in the employees and all of us that come together to support this great organization is our one singular mission for existing is to provide value to the Milton Hershey School, which is a school that Mr. Hershey started back in the 1900s for disadvantaged and underprivileged kids. It is still in existence today. He basically, his entire wealth was given to the school and our job these days is the value we provide. And the reason we're here is to generate value, experiences, income for the school to continue providing that experience for the kids, which is a K-12 experience for those kids in a residential setting and providing them experiences they would not otherwise have had. So it's a tremendous mission to be a part of.

Anil Chitkara:

Yeah, absolutely. Very tremendous approach to what he did. It's really incredible. Those 2,000 kids get to hopefully change their lives through that experience. And, everybody in the parks and resorts is focused on helping those kids in a way, right? You know, creating funding for the programs and their ability to learn.

Jason White:

Right. And, it's not just the funding. We match up with these students and those that have an interest in law and public safety. We work very closely with them to open their eyes to different avenues and any of their career paths that they have identified at the school. We have a match or a very close match to those with all of the trades and occupations we have within HE&R. So it does, it provides that added level of experience and real-world experience for these students. So they're not just sitting in a classroom, they're actually getting out and about and working with some mentors and those of us that are in the industry that they may want to pursue someday.

Anil Chitkara:

Yeah, that's tremendous. So let's talk a little bit more about the park itself, the park and resorts, Hershey Entertainment and Resorts. Before we get started, though, I want to congratulate you. You have been named one of the Top 50 influencers and theme parks by Blooloop Magazine. So congratulations on that.

Jason White:

Thank you very much, very humbled by that recognition and very thankful for it. It definitely takes a team to pull off what we do, not just here at Hershey, but throughout the amusement industry. And I'm a huge advocate of the fact that we all need to work together, share best practices. We've all got our trade secrets and the newest and latest, greatest attractions that we keep under wraps. But when it comes to safety, both employee and guest safety, we're all on the same page and we're all going to make each other better. We're all going to make the industry stronger by uniting. So it was definitely a very humbling to be recognized amongst that industry for sharing best practices and everything that goes into it. So thank you.

Anil Chitkara:

Great. And, hopefully we'll get time to really understand some of those best practices and share them with the group. So one of the things I want to talk about is your experiences there. So you've been there for 15 years. You've seen changes over time, up until at least the COVID time. We'll talk about the COVID time in a moment, but over those 15 years, what have you seen? What have you seen in terms of changes to the guests, changes to their experience, changes to security? That's been a very interesting time, I'm sure.

Jason White:

I mean, I think it goes without saying, and those of us that are in the safety and security public safety arena, I mean, everything changed after 9/11. Hersheypark used to be a park that you would come in through the gate. There were no security screenings. There were no surveillance cameras, very little technology at all. You came in and enjoyed your day at the park. And then once we, as society began to recognize these risks or threats, Hershey fell in line, and we elevated our security posture over the year. And we have really tried to leverage technology the best we can to provide a safe environment while at the same time, ensuring that the guest experience does not get diminished. That's the unique aspect of working in hospitality security. Those of us that are practitioners of security principles, generally it's build higher walls, higher fences, put more locks and doors and more cameras.

Jason White:

We need to try and accomplish the same thing in a hospitality sense, but at the same time, open the Gates and doors and welcome thousands upon thousands of people in. And then when they're here, keep them safe. And so it is ever-changing and evolving. I think trying to stay one or two steps ahead is the con and things we're chasing as we go through our planning cycles and gearing up for whatever that next threat or risk is going to be. But that also makes it very rewarding and the challenge I think, is what keeps a lot of us engaged.

Anil Chitkara:

Great. Great. Thank you, Jason. And let's talk a little bit more about 2020 now. It's been quite a year, obviously COVID has affected so much of everything. I think it was March 19th when the governor closed down, if I have the dates right in Pennsylvania, can you talk about what it generally, what it's been like since then? And I think one thing that's very unique about Hershey is you've got very different types of venues. You've got the theme park obviously, you've got an outdoor concert venue. You have indoor concert venues and theaters. You have a hotel, you have restaurants. So you have a wide range of different types of venues there. Can you just sort of walk us through a little bit, what it's been like since March and how you've managed security, safety, and reopening at the different venues you have on the property?

Jason White:

Sure, sure. And I think for us, it actually goes back a little before March. We started hearing some chatter long before COVID or coronavirus became a household name. Back in late January and February, we started hearing about this disease that was impacting China, and we started convening some small task forces to talk about is our supply chain going to be disrupted. We get a lot of our parts and machinery components from overseas. Are we going to start seeing any impact? And then to your point, it wasn't really till March where the government stepped in and said, okay, we need to start shutting some things down. So it really became a business continuity exercise for us in testing our business continuity plans. What kind of bench strength and depth do we have in different positions? And what ability do we have to be able to work remotely or close down our and be able to exist, so to speak without inviting the public or the guests into our venues?

Jason White:

We do have about 30+ business units ranging, as you said, from restaurants to premier hotels in the area, we have the amusement park, we have several concert venues, all of them to one point or another have been impacted. We were very fortunate that our resort properties, our hotels were considered essential, and we were able to keep those open albeit not many folks were coming out at the very onset of the pandemic. So we did not have many people coming in to spend room nights with us, but our restaurants closed, our entertainment venues closed. We have a couple of golf courses they could not operate. So it really became an exercise in trying to do, trying to keep the lights on, trying to secure the property and the assets.

Jason White:

Normally we have the benefit of hundreds upon hundreds of employees and their added sets of eyes and ears to help those of us charged with the physical security of the property. So we really had to start empowering more people. We started putting management-level employees in the line-level positions and training them on what our expectations were to help us secure the properties. And again, we've learned a great deal about human nature throughout the whole course of this entire pandemic and our reopening and things that we may have taken for granted in the past that generally, people come to Hershey, we advertise it as the sweetest place on earth. So nothing bad ever happens in Hershey. Now, a lot of us know that things do happen. We're just like everywhere else.

Jason White:

This year, though, it's been interesting to see the evolution of going from being closed, to being able to reopen in a limited capacity with restrictions placed upon us and having to enforce the public safety component and even just the general COVID safety protocols of mask wearing and social distancing. We've seen a definite swing in human nature in those that don't feel that the rules apply to them and their willingness to be confrontational. So it has been interesting to see that paradigm shift with our guests. Normally we do see some changes midsummer when we go from being more of a Central Pennsylvania audience to the more urban areas of New York City, Baltimore, Philadelphia come into Central Pennsylvania. So we normally see the differences in what people's normal social distance and comfort level is with having folks shoulder to shoulder versus Central Pennsylvania, which is more of a two to three feet, is where I feel comfortable.

Jason White:

This year that was almost a daily occurrence. So we really found ourselves having to empower and train our staff to a greater degree on how to successfully deescalate situations. And at the same time, we learned very early on the importance of establishing clear expectations, not only for our employees and team members, but also for the guests coming in. That way, we had something to hold them accountable to. So it definitely, it's been a very much a learning experience as we've navigated from business continuity through the reopening and the rebuilding of confidence with our guests and our season pass-holders, to the point where we're seeing things under restrictions, I mean, we're still limited by the number of people we can bring in, but people are coming and they're enjoying themselves as in they're having fun.

Jason White:

So I think we're successful in that regard that we are able to provide a safe of an environment as we can under the current conditions. And with those clear expectations, we've been able to establish for the guests, those incidents of needing to deescalate situations have diminished over the last few months.

Anil Chitkara:

Yeah. So you've been talking about de-escalation and you tease us a little while ago with, you've learned some things about human behavior. I'm curious, when you opened, so I think you open to your pass-holders at the end of June and the public more generally, I think it was July 3rd. I'm sure you had a plan in place and you trained your folks and you had de-escalation procedures and then actual people came in. You dealt with actual events, as you mentioned, people from outside of the immediate Central Pennsylvania area came back. How did your approach with your own employees that work sort of on the ground and then as it relates to them and the interactions with guests, how did that start? What was your sort of perspective? And then, when you got the reality of people coming in and trying to enjoy themselves, so to what changed over the summer, as you had real interactions with people and you learn from it?

Jason White:

Sure, sure. Great question. So we started off very similar, I'm sure to many other businesses that were reopening and were given a set of parameters with which we had to operate under. So we started with the standard, everyone wearing a mask and temperature checks of people coming through the gates, really hitting social distancing hard. And we learned very early on that folks were going to find any sort of loophole that they could. So we had to get very, very clear on what our expectation was specifically around face coverings. We learned just saying that you have to wear a mask or wear a cloth face covering was not enough. We had to define what we meant by that. We had some very silly examples of what people would put over their face to try and constitute a face covering. And use your imagination as to what they would do. Well, they got pretty creative, so we ended up having to get a very defined set of terms of what we consider a face covering.

Jason White:

And then we, in Pennsylvania, at least there was this, the cause that if you have a medical condition, you are not required to wear a face covering in Pennsylvania. However, we quickly learned that a lot of people coming in were using that to their advantage and claiming they have or might have, or had a medical condition. And we really had to evaluate for everyone that comes through the gate, team members and guests. And within the ADA guidelines, there is a provision in there that allows us to do so because it is considered unsafe for them not to be wearing a mask, but we got some fallout for that. However, it goes back to setting that very clear expectation for the guests of if you want to come in and enjoy these amenities and have this fun time, these are the rules you need to follow while you're here.

Jason White:

So the mask portion of this created some friction and those that were, I'll say, anti-mask, or opposed to having to wear the mask would get confrontational. So within the first several weeks, couple of weeks, it became very evident that we really had to get out in front with our line-level employees and empower them with more tools, more training, more education on how to best engage with those folks and not put themselves in a position where they got drawn into more of the confrontation and that they were able to handle it until it got to the point where somebody more qualified could step in and really, or someone more empowered to handle the situation was able to come in and address whatever the concern was.

Jason White:

We also continue to look for more opportunities to remove any of those friction, so then closing certain attractions, because we couldn't figure out a way to properly social distance, we took that into consideration. So anywhere where we could make a conscious decision to say, okay, we just can't figure out how to do this safely under the COVID restrictions. So we did add a couple of folks at strategic locations that simply served as a happy smiley face, not intimidating whatsoever. And just, Hey folks, remember put your mask up over your notes, Hey folks, remember to stay spaced out. So I think all of these things we learned as we went and really to the point now where I won't say that the grumbling has completely gone away, but folks no longer come in and say, I didn't know.

Anil Chitkara:

Jason, we're having a little bit of audio issues. If you want to just maybe stop the video and we'll keep the audio going and see if that helps. And then we can get back on video also.

Jason White:

All right. Is this any better?

Anil Chitkara:

Yeah, that's better.

Jason White:

All right.

Anil Chitkara:

So I want to pick up on this visitor experience on the human element. So much of the experience at a theme park at Hershey is very personal, not just the guests, but the interactions with your staff and your folks that work there. I think that's a key part of what the experience is for people. How have you used technology to address some of these friction points in the park itself? So, that you talked about guest members approaching guests where they might not be wearing a mask where they need to encourage them to be socially distant. How have you used technology within the park itself? We've heard things about tracking folks that maybe aren't complying or contact tracing, or a lot of different ways to use the technology, but I'm interested to hear how you've been using technology in the park since COVID to try to keep people safe and also have them enjoy their experience.

Jason White:

Sure, sure. And I think that probably the thing that's closest to home for me is obviously the security practices that we've implemented. And we have the benefit and the fortune of having moved in, we were moving in a direction with our physical security procedures and our search procedures that paid off huge dividends when COVID hit. About six months before COVID hit, we were already exploring different options for a physical security screening and searching folks coming in. We were able to redesign in our front gate that the company recently had the biggest capital investment in our history in expanding the front gate area, which allowed us to really design a front gate that was meant, and had the ability for us to screen folks more than just a standard bag check of folks coming in.

Jason White:

So we did a move forward with technology using the Evolv systems that provided us that touchless capability, which as it turned out with the COVID protocol we had to implement was huge. So not only were we providing a higher degree of safety and security through the technology and the capabilities of the Evolv units, we were able to do it for the most part touch-free and contactless, albeit for any secondary searches that we would have to do, which were greatly reduced by using the technology. So that has been huge. And it has been so well-received by both our guests and our employees for any number of reasons. But that's just one example from the security side.

Jason White:

We're also attempting on the guest experience side, through one of our up and coming platforms called HPGO, which really is an exclusive platform that we rolled out. We started rolling it out back in 2018, and it's a tool that we can use. It helps us understand guests behavior while improving their guest experience, and then also potentially driving some of their ancillary spending. And it's using RFID wristbands with our app and some different readers throughout the park. So it enables us to collect guest information, but it also provides value to guests. They're able to load some pretty purchased items on to that. We're continuing to explore some other potentials and possibilities with this HPGO, that we could expand some of the cashless transactions that we currently offer to include our games locations and really making it a benefit to our season pass-holders to our guests coming in, where we can under a COVID restriction, we can minimize that exchange between the employees and the guests, but it also provides a much more efficient and time-saving opportunity for our guests.

Anil Chitkara:

Yeah. And interesting. Jason, and there's this HPGO sounds really interesting. Very consumer-focused. It sounds like it's got a lot of value to the guests. What's some of the specific feedback you've gotten or what are some of unexpected benefits that you've gotten from the HPGO system?

Jason White:

So, and again, I'm not extremely well-versed in all of the ins and outs of HPGO, it's a bit out of my purview. I know it has been very well-received. Some other larger parks in the country are using similar type platforms. This is something that we developed specifically for Hershey, but I'm hearing a lot of very positive feedback from guests that this is great. It's so time-saving, it so efficient. I can pretty load things in advance from our website or from the app. We've even, it's got some interactive features where you can track your status from different competitive rides that we offer where you know if you're in first place or second place for that given day or where you ranked for the summer. So it offers some of that guest engagement and really two-way information. And then from an organization standpoint, we can tell when they're using it, where they're being redeemed. So we can kind of track guests movement. We can understand and provide better amenities to them based upon the data that our teams are able to collect. So all in all, it has been very, very well-received.

Anil Chitkara:

Yeah. And this COVID environment's been challenging, it's caused people to sort of think about things differently, think about processes differently, think about technology differently. As you think of the post-COVID era and there will be a post-COVID era. We all hope and hope it comes fairly soon. Do you see Hersheypark thinking about technology different? Do you see them continuing to embrace the technology? This has been a little bit of a unique time, which has allowed you to try some things in a specific environment, but as you look forward, what do you think that use of technology and how Hershey would think about it as it relates to security, as it relates to the guest experience, as it relates to the overall guest experience in the park?

Jason White:

Well, I think if there has been a benefit to having to operate under these COVID restrictions is that it has forced us to think differently, whether it be from employees having to work remotely and still add value, even though that they're not sitting in their office or cubicle or their workstation. So that I think we will continue to look for ways to ensure that we're providing our employees the best opportunity to contribute whether they're here in an office or they're sitting at home having to work remotely. I think with regard to our operation at the properties, whether it be the resorts properties, whether it be Hersheypark or our concert venues, we are going to continue to look at this and leveraging technology that will increase that guest experience. That's what it's all about.

Jason White:

And if the side benefit to providing heightened guest experience is that we can move them a little quicker or move them a little bit more frictionless, I think that that's where nothing's off the table at this point. We are still going to continue looking at the guest side from the security. This has been something that we've been constantly evaluating over the years. So we're looking to really capitalize on areas such as our surveillance view camera systems and using them less as an investigatory tool, which we do every single day and having them work more for us. So threat detection, intrusion detection, embracing the technology that is available through those systems to be more proactive, to give us that shorter response time and reaction time to be able to get ahead of a city situation rather than using it, using cameras and oftentimes how they've been used historically is something's happened. And you go back and look at footage and say, Oh yeah, look at that because you don't have the personnel or the resources to continually monitor the bank of cameras that you have deployed.

Jason White:

So we are continuing to look at all avenues of our security technology, as well as how we can integrate them. And how can we take the different systems we have, whether it be access control and cameras and alarm systems, and really integrate them one usable platform that really allows us to monitor and get a sense of the big picture when it's happening. So, yes, to answer your question, I believe that it has really just heightened our awareness and our commitment to look, we can best leverage technology.

Anil Chitkara:

Great. And there's a lot of interest in a little more detail on your security infrastructure and approach. Can you just share, what is the structure of your security organization? Is it Hershey employees? Do you use third-party security firms? Do you use local law enforcement and how do you integrate if you do, how do you integrate them into your overall security approach at your properties?

Jason White:

Sure. So we do have proprietary security force each of our main property. So our two resort properties, as well as the Hershey Entertainment complex, which is the park and all of our concert venues each have their own security department that is proprietary. So our manpower right now, well, I won't say right now in COVID, but our normal compliment of staffing is generally around 900 security officers. We do supplement on days where we have large events or big concerts. We will use some contract security and we do then rely up also upon our public sector partners with law enforcement to come in and provide support on those large events where we have a higher risk due to the nature of whatever the event may be.

Jason White:

We also have, we have an awesome and outstanding relationship with our community partners on the law enforcement side at the local state and federal level. So we get a lot of support from them. Our local guys, we have a substation right on property. So we have their presence on a regular basis. And then we've gone so far as hosting a federal department of Homeland Security exercises. So it runs the gamut local to federal on the law enforcement side, at least getting the agencies in and getting a familiarization of our area of our operations, getting those relationships in place in advance. I do not currently employ any law enforcement on my staff that serve as active law enforcement while they're here at Hershey. We are very dependent upon our local and state partners for that.

Anil Chitkara:

Great. That's great. Thank you, Jason. And this has come up at various times, from a public health perspective, we've talked a little bit about the social distancing and sanitization, but are there other things you're doing? Are you doing temperature checks or you're not doing temperature checks? What's your perspective on that? And any other specific protocols you may be putting in place as people come through?

Jason White:

Sure. So we have, from a public health standpoint, we are not required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to do temperature checks for the general public or for the guests. To provide that extra level of peace of mind and that extra level of public health and safety, we have implemented from the beginning temperature checks for everybody coming to our venues. So our employees come through their employee entrance and get screened with a COVID questionnaire or COVID questions and checks on a daily basis. And any guests that comes in is also going through a screening of symptomology, as well as thermal or temperature checks.

Jason White:

Those have gone very, very well with the folks coming in. It has not really slowed our process for screening of folks coming in. And it has been very well-received by the guests. I think there's an expectation now that when we're introducing that many people into a single area, they expect it. They sign off on it. In conjunction with that though, and again, with the establishing of expectations that I spoke about earlier, everybody that comes to the park right now has to have a reservation. So when you go on and you buy your tickets, you make a reservation. At which point you're clicking a box saying, I understand all of these expectations. So you know in advance, you're going to get your temperature check. We're very clear that if you have this, the list of symptoms, or if you're running a fever, which is one of the symptoms, please don't come. Plan to visit another day. That way when they get here again, they're not surprised.

Jason White:

So I think that, and then in conjunction with that on the other side of the coin is our response to potential exposures. We have 8,000 employees that work for Hershey Entertainment and Resort. Just by the mere numbers of what we're dealing with, we've had folks that have symptomology. We've had folks that have come in and said, Hey, I was in close contact with Uncle Bill and Uncle Bill is now positive. We've had a much, much smaller number of people that have actually been positive for COVID. However, we have very, very strict and very detailed exposure response plans that have worked very well for us to the point where we've had no cases of community spread within HE&R, which is something we're very proud of.

Jason White:

We've taken the CDC and the state guidelines, and we've actually kicked them up a notch, and we're doing things a bit more stringent than we're required to, but it goes to serve to our commitment for safety, which is at the forefront of everything we do, guest and employee safety. So we are very serious when we go through and we do a screening for folks, any signs of symptomology, any contact with possible or probable or confirmed cases with no degree of separation, we're making you quarantine and not be here because we want to keep this as clean as we possibly can and keep people coming and keeping them healthy. So we're very proud of the fact that we've had zero community spread throughout the organization.

Anil Chitkara:

Yeah, that's a tremendous accomplishment. Tremendous. So you've talked a lot about the experience you've had over the last few months with COVID coming back, the protocols, if you just summed it up in a couple of lessons learned, what would you share? What are the things that in retrospect, really good learnings that you had?

Jason White:

I think they never underestimate the importance of establishing very clear expectations, both for those you're welcoming into your venue, as well as those that are employed with you. I think it's, none of us could have anticipated the impact that this was going to have on us as a society, on us as businesses. I'd like to say that we did have an infectious disease plan prior to all of this happening, I think back now, and I kind of laughed to myself at what we thought was a very comprehensive and detailed plan. Pretty much went out the window after about week two, as we continued to have to deal with the impact of what we were faced with and what all of us we in the country had been faced with.

Jason White:

So I think it goes to serve business continuity efforts. I can't underestimate that enough. And I think our ability to plan ahead, to make sure we had bench strength, to make sure we have the ability when we do lose somebody to quarantine, that we're able to still perform that critical role within the organization. And the establishing of those expectations, I think have been the biggest two lessons learned throughout the course of this experience.

Anil Chitkara:

Great. That's great. So, I ask each of our guests on, as you think to the future, what is one of the enduring changes you've made that you think will continue beyond the COVID era?

Jason White:

So I think it's going to be, I think the most enduring change is the realization that employees don't necessarily have to be present to add value. I think we've all become much more well-versed in being able to work remotely and still get the job done. And that's probably the case for the majority of the folks here at Hershey. They're still the folks where "we need the boots on the ground" doing certain things, but for all intents and purposes, I think that ability to work remotely, I think is going to be with us. I think it's really going to have businesses and organizations evaluate some of their business models as we continue to move forward. Some of the studies I've read actually that they've done have said people have been more productive and work long at home than they normally would have from the office place. Which to me is just an interesting, a very interesting fact that they've come up with that we can trust our employees to work independently and provide the value and get the job done.

Anil Chitkara:

That's well said, Jason, thank you very much. So I want to thank you, Jason. I want to thank you first for keeping the people in Central Pennsylvania safe and healthy with all the work you and your team are doing and all those that visit the parks and resorts and your properties and various venues that you've got there, the various locations. So thank you for that. And for sharing that experience with us, it's tremendously valuable to hear some very specific practical advice, guidance, and things that were done, protocols, processes, and the lessons learned. So thank you for being very frank and sharing your experience with us.

Jason White:

My pleasure. Again, I think, for those of us in the hospitality and the amusement industry, it only makes us all better, it only makes the industry better the more we can share both our successes and our opportunities, so that we can ensure that the folks still want to come out to our venues and our property and enjoy the amenities that we offer.

Anil Chitkara:

Great. And I want to thank each of you that are with us today and for all the work you're doing to keep people safe and for looking for ways to enhance their experience. Stay safe, stay healthy, and never stop thinking about how technology can help, how it can help make your venue safer, make them more enjoyable. Thank you.

 

The Digital Threshold

Enabling Adaptability for Years to Come

Digital transformation is unlocking efficiency and value everywhere as organizations reimagine archaic processes and technology, better equipping themselves with interoperable and flexible capabilities. Within the Digital Threshold vision, venues and facilities can intelligently use data to create a frictionless experience for guests and employees. The result is an entry process that enhances the overall experience instead of diminishing it as it so often does today. Making weapons screening faster and more precise is part of the Digital Threshold vision, but it’s just the beginning.